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Our Story

When everyone has access to the same unlimited power, capabilities and ability to work with others, regardless of where they are in the world, who they work for or their experience, then the only barrier to their success will be their talent and drive

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David Peto

Co-Founder & CEO, Aframe

I’m a geek. I love technology, and I like knowing about how it works. But at the same time, I have absolutely no patience if it isn’t something I can get value from really quickly.

I used to be the biggest advocate of technical training and a board member of the skills council for the sector until I realized that the reason people don’t learn about video technology and evolve their business processes is because they simply don't have the time.

For too long, technology has dominated creativity. Video should be about innovation not technology. Who cares what expensive equipment a company has – it should be about the people who work there. When everyone has access to the same unlimited power, capabilities and ability to work with others, regardless of where they are in the world, who they work for or their experience, then the only barrier to their success will be their talent and drive.

This is what Aframe is about. Giving anyone, anywhere, the ability to realize their creative vision and business goals by removing the limitations to their success, with a system that is unlimited, powerful and very simple to use.

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Aframe: What's in the name?

Our customers sometimes ask us why we're called Aframe, some simply spell it wrong.

In engineering terms, an A-frame is a simple structure with a light and efficient design, able to bear loads in a stable, economic manner. The simplest form of an A-frame structure is two similarly sized beams, arranged at a 45-degree angle, attached at the top. Common uses for the A-frame structure are ladders, houses, tents and even the support for the London Eye.

We made Aframe to be similarly efficient and robust.

In film terms, a 'frame' describes the still images that make up the complete moving picture. Single images were recorded on a strip of photographic film that looked like a framed picture when viewed individually. When the moving picture is displayed, each frame is flashed on a screen for a short time before being replaced by the next. The eye blends the frames together, producing the illusion of a moving image. The rate at which these frames are displayed per second is a common unit of measurement, called frame rate, with 25 fps being the most common standard in use.

So that's Aframe. Capital A, lower case f and definitely no hyphen.